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British Values and SMSC

British values and SMSC

 

British values and SMSC (social, moral, spiritual and cultural) are actively promoted within school life. Our strategy encompasses the below:

British values

Democracy (social, moral, spiritual and cultural)

  • The principles are taught through five years of religious studies lessons on different religious societies and cultures and their spiritual beliefs, with a focus on ethics and morality; and a minimum of two years of history lessons, which also encompasses social issues, culture through time and morality.
  • Students also cover a citizenship module in tutor time, in the spring term where they will look at how citizens can influence decision-making through the democratic process and material on the strengths, advantages and disadvantages of democracy in society, and how democracy and the law works in Britain, in contrast to other forms of government in other countries and cultures
  • Additionally, through our student council, every student in the school is able to have a voice when it comes to the school society. Each student is able to contribute to their tutor group’s collective input to the student council. Please click here for an example of the last student council meeting agenda.

Rule of law (social and moral)

  • Students are taught this explicitly within our behaviour for learning framework and understand the ‘rule of law’ within the school, the importance of morality and respect, and that actions have consequences.
  • Students learn about the rule of law in the outside world through PSHE lessons – they learn about the protected characteristics, legislation connected to 16 year olds, the law when it comes to alcohol, drugs, social media, gang culture and knife crime, as well as the moral and societal implications, to name some examples.

Individual liberty (spiritual and cultural)

  • Students are taught that they are free to believe, act and express themselves freely, developing their own spirituality. The majority of this is covered in the PSHE curriculum, with threads throughout each year group as follows: being me in my world, dreams and goals and changing me, using mindfulness as a deeply reflective spiritual technique.
  • Additionally, students are encouraged to participate in extra-curricular activities to enhance their talents and personalities, drawing on cultural learnings within art, drama and music for example.
  • The house system also allows for individual freedom, expression and spiritual creativity: we have a range of competitions for students to enter: The Visual Arts Cup, Light Hall’s Got Talent, the Enterprise Cup and House Athletics. Also, the Macmillan bake sale every year encourages students with culinary talents.
  • There are also many other events students can participate in: termly library competitions, numeracy competitions, as well as students being recognised for student leadership and subject braids, all designed to develop the spirit and character of our students.
  • In tutor time, students follow a half termly programme of reflection against the Light Hall Learning Skills.

Mutual respect and tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs (social, moral, spiritual and cultural)

  • We have a very diverse student population at Light Hall, so mutual tolerance and respect is a way of life. This is modelled by the staff and by the students daily. Our discriminatory log shows few examples of our students behaving otherwise, demonstrating a strong sense of morality and social cohesion amongst our students.
  • All students study religious education and spirituality for five years at Light Hall.
  • Students are exposed to a wide range of diverse cultures through art, music and drama lessons in Key Stage Three.
  • Year 7 students complete an inter-faith week project in tutor time as part of their Light Hall Award, studying diverse cultures, spirituality and religions.

 

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